The Strokes Battle Alien Robots (At Baseball!) In ‘The Adults Are Talking’

Check out their new video…

The Strokes have shared the Roman Coppola directed video for ‘The Adults Are Talking’.

The band’s album ‘The New Abnormal’ landed this year, following sessions with Rick Rubin at Shangri-La Studios in Malibu.

Arguably their best in a decade, it prompted a memorable night in London before the pandemic intervened.

Ending 2020 on a high, The Strokes re-visit album highlight ‘The Adults Are Talking’ for their new video.

Online now, the Roman Coppola directed clip features the New York indie legends battling alien robots are baseball.

Naturally!

Tune in now.

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“Each Of My Albums Has Helped Me Discover Something” Clash Meets Emmy The Great

Embracing motherhood and releasing her most personal album to date…

Emma Lee Moss, aka Emmy The Great, has had a pretty great 2020, all things considered. Between releasing her critically acclaimed fourth album ‘April / 月音’, and performing it to a socially distanced – and extremely grateful – audience at the Barbican in October, the musician and writer also provided the soundtrack for her friend Sara Pascoe’s latest sitcom ‘Out Of Her Mind’, and produced two radio programmes for the BBC. Oh, and she’s working on a musical about female wrestlers.

Somehow, she found the time to chat to Clash about writing bilingually on ‘April / 月音’, performing during a pandemic, and settling in London after a life spent in transit.

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Hi Emma! Congratulations on the Barbican show! Did you enjoy it?

It was wonderful – I couldn’t really believe that we were playing a gig. There was this consensus before we went on stage that it was potentially the only gig that any of us would play [this year] and we just had to have a good time. It felt weird at first – usually you’re waiting for the energy of the audience to come like a massive wave, but in this case it was coming in these individual, quiet pockets, and I had to really switch my brain into this mode of seeing each person’s private appreciation rather than thinking of it as a crowd.

At first it was like ‘oh my god everyone’s wearing masks, maybe they don’t like it’, and then I thought, people have put themselves in actual mortal danger just to come to this gig, so essentially the energy is there, it’s extremely there. Everyone had put in so much effort to be there, everyone on stage, offstage, in the audience, all the tech people, the Barbican, it was quite moving. 

‘April / 月音’ has been received so well by both critics and fans – were you pleased with the response?

I feel so happy, I’ve never had an album where so many people kind of understood it. It’s quite a weird album because it comes from a lot of perspectives that I wouldn’t expect to share with the wider British person, so the fact that people are noticing things that I was kind of hoping they would, no matter who they are,makes me really really happy. It makes me feel like humans connect a lot more than you think when you’re worried about the world.

It’s funny, you wrote the album in 2018 but there’s a sense of not knowing what the future looks like yet, and trying to piece it together that resonates this year.

Yeah a lot of the lyrics are about letting fate take its course. Since I went to China [Emma spent part of 2017 doing a residency in Xianmen] I’ve always felt like sometimes these weird serendipitous moments come out of nowhere, and you’re like OK, well I bumped into someone that I thought I would so therefore I must be on the right path – which is also apparently a symptom of anxiety, so I don’t know if I’m slightly Buddhist or just really anxious.

I found that at the beginning of lockdown, when everyone was sort of slightly jolted. that there was a lot of weird stuff happening, like the universe was kind of shaking or something. I think in times of peril you look for more signs.

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Is it nice being in London? In ‘April/月音’ there are mentions of your time spent in Hong Kong, Barcelona and New York, and you explore feeling liminal and occupying different spaces. Are you feeling stuck or are you enjoying staying in one place for a while?

The sense of permanence that has come with moving back to London, even in these circumstances, has been really welcome. I think that’s what I wanted from this album – to find my way home.

Each of my albums has helped me discover something, and I’ve come to kind of rely on them as part of my personal life journey. When I started making it I was like ‘What’s the most valuable thing that I could learn from this?’ and it was that I’ve got to figure out where I live, and I think I have which is great. I gave myself a brief and followed it, and here I am!

You grew up speaking both Cantonese and English, but ‘April/月音’ was your first time writing in Cantonese. How did it compare to your normal songwriting process?

Those songs were very much the most personal bits. I always thought of the album as – this sounds poncy, but – autofiction; it’s sort of my stories but it’s also very fictional. But all the Cantonese stuff is extremely real, like snapshots of my real life, and I think the reason I wanted to put it in Cantonese is because it was just so personal. I know that billions of people speak Cantonese, but in my life it’s only me and two other people, so it felt more private.

You’ve talked about your love of Cantopop and the influence it had on the album…

I’m a superfan, I love that genre. It’s so cheesy, but also so deep. They really believe, I think— Hong Kong pop icons—they really believe what they’re doing.

What else were you listening to while you were making this album?

Actually, I was doing a lot of meditating to bowls, singing bowls and I never do that anymore because I have a child. I also was listening a lot to Brian Eno’s ambient work, and Ryuichi Sakamoto’s album ‘async’; loads of really ambient stuff that allowed me to listen to pipes in the wall and stuff at the same time, that was fun.

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There’s a lot of ambient sound in the background of the album. Did you record it yourself?

Yes, I was walking around Hong Kong, and on trips in Asia with my field recorder. That’s the kind of thing I just enjoy doing, the other day I was listening to the radio and a listener had sent in their field recordings of a tree and an owl, and I was like ‘this is great, turn it up!’ It’s really fun to listen to places. I sometimes go on that website Freesound and just listen to people’s recordings. A lot of the time it sounds terrible, it’s got too much hiss in the background, but you think: this is a place, this is someone’s time, it’s the sound of someone’s time.

Actually, that’s what we’re going to do this week, me and my daughter, we’re going to do some recordings and turn them into something, we don’t know what yet!

What else have you been doing over lockdown?

I’ve just been working a lot. I’ve been really lucky so far because during maternity leave [Emma’s daughter was born in early 2019] I pushed a lot of projects back, so I’m still working through the year that I took off on lots of stuff, for radio or writing songs for other people. I’ve written the first act of a musical about female wrestling with the playwright Isley Lynn which is really fun, and we’re working on the second half.

And then after that, I’m not sure, the end of this year is a bit of a cliff edge, I don’t actually know what happens at the end of this year because all my projects will be completed. But I’m so excited to get through everything and start again.

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‘April / 月音’ is out now on Bella Union.

Words: Jess Wrigglesworth

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Pete Tong And The Heritage Orchestra Ibiza Classics Christmas Rave Livestream From The O2 Arena

Free tickets for O2 customers…

Ravers rejoice. For one night only, Pete Tong daddy cool of Dance music, The Heritage Orchestra and Jules Buckley return to The O2 to transport music lovers back to Ibiza for the ultimate Christmas rave broadcast to viewers at home.

The show was first held at the The 02 arena back in December 2016 and has returned to sell out crowds each year. This years performance still going ahead in a virtual capacity adapted for broadcast is a highly commendable measure of the U.K. live industrys resilience and refusal to let the soundsystems fall silent.

Available to watch on Saturday 19th December 2020 via LIVENow, fans are invited to join in the Ibiza Classics party and transform their living room into their own Balearic paradise without paying £20 for a bottle of water.

Equally as exciting, this is the first music event at The O2 arena since the venue closed in March due to the pandemic. and it promises to breathe some life back into the arena as performers and musicians take advantage of the space. Filling the arena floor with a visually spectacular night of live dance music and togetherness.

Pete Tong commented: “2020, our whole year has been lost, no tours no shows no exceptions! We can’t be together in clubs or concert. arenas BUT we can still put on a show for you. We’re going to perfrom from the floor of the O2 arena and broadcast it right into your homes. The rave will be back one day but for now we are going to make the most of what we have!”

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O2 customers can register for free tickets via the Priority App here from 9am Wednesday 25th November until the day of the event, Saturday 19th December, with only a booking fee of 50p applying.

Early bird tickets are priced at £10 and go on general sale at 9am on Friday 27th November from www.theo2.co.uk.

In addition, Pete Tong presents Ibiza Classics with The Heritage Orchestra and Jules Buckley will return with a live audience to The O2 on 4th and 5th December 2021 – another reason to be cheerful.

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Other Reads…

Clash x O2 Priority Concert Announcements Oct-Nov:

Pete Tong & The Heritage Orchestra 2021 Tour Dates

Clash & O2 Join Forces

Gorillaz SONG MACHINE Tour

Liam Gallagher Down By The River Thames

Jess Glynne – 2021 Tour Dates

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Revisit last years sold out show at The O2, London

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Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Caught In Conversation With Goya Gumbani

Get to know the trans-Atlantic rising star…

Born and raised in Brooklyn, New York City, the rising artist Goya Gumbani has been catching the eyes of many worldwide. Having recently made an appearance on ‘COLORS’ with his blissful performance of “Blasé”, the now London-based musician, who’s transatlantic upbringing glimmers throughout his sound has released his newly-formed project titled, ‘Truth Be Sold’.

Gumbani’s music is deeply rooted within his profound ability to story-tell, spending over a decade perfecting his unquestionable craft, he first broke through with his self-produced debut EP ‘Morta & More Doves’ back in 2018; paying a warming dedication to his sister who passed away, this cemented his forthcoming position within the scene.

Exploring a variety of topics including personal growth, life, death, and materialism, ‘Truth Be Sold’ is enriched with an assortment of flavour-some textures from start to finish. Clocking in at just over 15 minutes long, this six-track EP features guest appearances from George Riley, Elijah Maja and houses production from UK-based beat-smith Oliver Palfreyman.

Following the release, we recently caught up with Goya Gumbani to talk all about his latest project and more.

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How have you been? How have you been affected by the pandemic?

I’ve been good, the pandemic has been kinda trash but cool at the same time, can’t really do shit – that’s a blessing and a curse.

I’ve been speaking to a few artists recently and they said their productivity has taken a knock due to the pandemic. How have you found this period creatively?

It’s been good for me to be honest, I’m on the same time I was on before the pandemic.

For people who aren’t aware of who you are, could you tell us a bit more about your upbringing and how you were introduced to music?

I’m from Canarsie, I came to London for the first time when I was 15, it was an eye-opening experience. My intro to music was Hot97 and BET to be honest, and the CDs my mom used to play in the V (car).

In moving from New York to London at a young age, what do you take from both cities for inspiration?Were there any artists you were drawn to here in the UK when you moved? Maybe in the grime era?

Yeah, I rocked with Ghetts, Chipmunk etc, but who I really took to was the U.K. Lovers Rock scene and Garage – Janet Kay, Dillinger, UB40, Desmond Dekker, Louisa Mark were so hard.

You recently featured on ‘COLORS’ which is dope! How did this come about? How did you find the experience?

Erm, shit just happened to be honest, it was good! Really cool and welcoming team over there, forever grateful to those folks.

That platform tends to really widen your audience, what has the feedback been like? The feedback been great, it’s been coming from everywhere.

You recently dropped the ‘Truth Be Sold’ EP. Tell us a bit more about the concept or messages you wanted to push with this project?

Everything comes with a price, good and bad, and time is the most precious currency. Bring safety, truth, and knowledge to ALL Black people.

Were there any songs that challenged you? Maybe lyrically or sonically?

Nahhh.

Through listening to your catalogue, you come across as an artist that holds quality over quantity. Is this something you strive for in your music?

I mean, that’s just how I am with everything, but the music is a release for me, it’s me writing in my journal and showing you the page.

Would you agree that in our current soundscape several artists are losing the quality in their music? Or do you think that is just down to the commercial trend and people trying to create a ‘hit’?

To be honest, I ain’t been listening to a lot of new music so I don’t really know, I’ve been in my vintage vinyl bag.

Having now released the project, are there any tracks in particular that resonate with you more now in comparison to the recording process?

Normally no, but Elijah’s verse on ‘Hither Green’ hits different every time.

What can we expect to see you from you this 2021?

More music, more visuals and fingers crossed at a show near you!

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Words: Elle Evans

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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“They’re Really Off The Cuff!” Sophie Ellis-Bextor On Her Disco Havens

The pop queen is searching for light amid the gloom…

Sophie Ellis-Bextor has been an unrelenting blast of positivity amid the clouds of 2020.

The pop heroine’s kitchen discos have become the stuff of social media legend, belting out classics while her kids race around her feet.

The sight of someone living their best life in spite of it all seemed to chime a chord a fans during lockdown, with a huge digital community clustering around the broadcasts.

New album ‘Songs From The Kitchen Disco’ is a neat document of this time, with Sophie recording some studio versions of those karaoke staples.

Taken as a whole, though, it’s also a neat catch-up on her stellar catalogue, one that has peppered the charts with golden pop moments for 20 years now.

Clash caught up with Sophie on the album’s release…

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For a lot of people you’ve been a shard of light this year, Sophie!

Aww! (laughs) Thank you! I know that for us, I don’t know what I would have done if we didn’t have the discos happening… because they really kept us all focussed and distracted. They were such a good tonic.

It always looks as though you’re living your best life…

It’s funny you say that as I don’t really feel that’s what we’re exhibiting! I think it’s more like a cartoon version of what everyone was feeling on the inside. I just wanted to feel like me, and I wanted to have some fun. But I’m suddenly stuck at home, I can’t go anywhere, the kids are everywhere… this is kinda chaos, but let’s see if we can shimmy our way through it!

Some artists have relished time at home. What’s your experience been like? I suppose for me the kitchen discos aren’t a replacement for my work. It felt more like what my family do when we need to relieve tension in our house. I had my first baby 16 years ago, and since then we’ve always had music in our lives. There’s been a constant soundtrack. If we’re feeling anxious about things or commiserating or if there’s something exciting happening then music is played. We have different songs for different moods.

When the lockdown started, I found that firstly I had this overwhelming of wanting to connect with people. I thought, oh my goodness, I want to phone everyone I’ve ever known to check if they’re OK! I’m glad it didn’t act on that impulse… but that’s what I felt! And then the second thing was, I felt quite useless, I felt discombobulated, I couldn’t reach out in the way I normally could have done, and I can’t accompany myself on piano, I can’t play guitar very well… so I thought, these are not talents I have, where I can record a song and be like – there you go, here’s a song!

So when Richard said about doing a disco, it’s like: that makes sense! Because that’s what our kitchen looks like anyway, that’s what the playroom looks like. Even this morning when I got the kids ready for school, we put some music on and had a little bop around. It just relieves tension! It puts people in better spirits. So, I wasn’t thinking about myself as a performer or a singer, it’s more that this is what we do when we need a bit of recalibrating, really.

So it would have been happening regardless?

Exactly. But also, for me, I feel the way I do whenever anything effects me in my life – good, bad or ugly – I’m glad that I have a creative job where I’m allowed to absorb and interpret what’s going on around me and put it down into my work. I’ve used that since I was a teenager.

Heartache, falling in love… anything that’s affected me, I’ve put it into music and I’ve written songs about it. Being able to put it into music is a lovely way to bring something good out of something wobbly. But y’know – it’s tough out there. I’m not looking forward to this winter, I think it’ll feel quite long and quite gloomy. So yeah, like everybody, just looking to remain as optimistic as possible but also being realistic about where we’re at.

How far out do you plan these things?

Oh God they’re really off the cuff! But I’m quite like that with my gigs, too. Not so much with set lists normally, but I’m not someone that likes to prepare everything to the Nth degree… that’s probably a good thing! The thing is, over the years I’ve learned that a lot of things can go wrong at the last minute, if you’re someone who is really obsessive over planning then something going wrong or changing can really throw you. So for me, I’d rather keep quite loose around the edges, just so you can adapt to whatever actually happens.

With the discos… they were fun! So planning the songs and choosing the covers… that’s meant to be fun! It’s not like homework. It’s a lovely thing, to sit and think: what song would I love to sing, or what song would put us all in the right place to tell the story? And that can be literally decided on the day.

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Your Kate Bush cover recently felt very brave – that’s such an idiosyncratic vocal to attempt!

It’s funny… if I was singing it onstage I’d be worried about it, but when you’re doing karaoke in the sitting room while your kids run around it’s a lot more chilled. And also, the thing I love about songs like that is that they’re fantastic records, and they tell really good stories. So for me, I’m more thinking, well it’s a lovely opportunity to get lost in that story. I’ve always loved that song. So I don’t really think about hard it is, I just chuck myself in! It’s supposed to be fun – it’s not supposed to be reverential.

The new video is filmed in empty London venues, which was really moving. Has it been challenging to see what side of the industry struggle in 2020?

Oh yeah. Really challenging. I mean, most of my friends are people who are crew, or musicians, or work in the arts… and it’s a really uncertain time. I think earlier in the year everyone felt quite discombobulated, but they also felt like: OK, this is what’s happening, so we’d better get on with that empty diary! But now we’re on Autumn, and there’s still lots of question marks, people’s tone has changed to one of being frightened and being angry. I’m really, really aware of it. Up until now I sort of didn’t think too much about the industry and the economy of what it is I do. I think about when I’m working.

I did a gig about a month ago at G.A.Y. and it was the first gig my soundman had done in six months. And you almost forget about that – you don’t think about the concentric circles. And also, just the fact that all these beautiful venues that are filled with so many memories, and usually so full of life, are just lying dormant. And a lot of people feel like they haven’t really been addressed or spoken to, to make them feel re-assured that someone is thinking of them.

The nightclub industry – all of it – has just fallen off the radar… no one is even thinking about it! And there’s all these holes that have opened up, and it’s been left to individuals to close it all up again. And that’s actually really scary and daunting. Some of these people have trained for decades to have employable skills, and now they’re just sitting, waiting, and wondering what’s going to happen. It’s frightening.

You mention G.A.Y. – the role of physical spaces is particularly key in the LGBTQ+ community, isn’t it?

Yeah, it is. I think G.A.Y. in particular has been a touchstone for me at different parts of my career, and has meant an awful lot to me. I played there after my first baby – oh… about 14 years ago now! – and I’d been away for a little while, it was my first gig back, and I was quite nervous. I remember walking out at G.A.Y. and the warmth and support from the crowd made me think: what am I scared of…? It was the moment where I lost my inhibitions a bit, really, and it changed me as a performer.

Those physical spaces, having people together… it’s good for the soul! – It’s such a weird time, and there’s so much that will come out of this. It’s not all doom and gloom, but there’s a lot that’s part of our casual lives that actually forms the glue of what keeps you on the right side of being OK with things… and having those things taken away – it starts to chip away, doesn’t it?

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The album is a neat encapsulation of your catalogue – were you overdue a look back, do you think?

Ordinarily, no! I don’t normally do that! But specifically this year I found myself looking back a lot, and feeling quite nostalgic. And because we were doing the home discos, and I found myself running through different singles, and an album track or two, it was really nice to rediscover things I hadn’t sung in ages. I really enjoyed it! So I thought, yeah, let’s put it all together, put some cover versions on there. Just a little nod to what’s gone on this year.

Just for me, it’s a nice thing to do to put something together and celebrates it. For our family the kitchen disco has really changed the course of what I was going to do next… and I am in the middle of making a new album but I probably won’t get a chance to finish it as quickly as I wanted, so it’s been really lovely to pay tribute to it in another way.

Does your relationship with certain songs change over time?

It’s really hard to say! It’s like any long-term relationship. There’s an evolution… but in other ways music has always been something that is a little bit of a time portal. I’m sure it’s the same for you, but if I hear a song that I loved as a teenager then part of me is a teenager again when I sing along.

I think sometimes the songs I sing – like ‘Murder On The Dancefloor’ or ‘Groovejet’ – they kind of feel like a little bit of time travel, it connects me to this journey that we’ve done together. I think of all the places I’ve sung it, all the people who’ve sung it back to me. I feel really lucky, though, because not everyone has a good relationship with their back catalogue… and I actually do! I’m happy to sing any of the songs that I’ve put out into the world.

One of the things that comes across when taken as a whole is how often your songs will play with that sweet / sour, light / shade dynamic – a melancholic vocal in a disco setting…

I love that. I’m a bit obsessed with that in music! It’s one of my favourite emotions… when it tugs at your heart. The bittersweet melancholy that’s underneath it all. If people don’t listen to lyrics of songs they probably don’t respond to it in as deep a way as they could do. Some songs are massive hits, and they don’t realise that they’re actually a bit dark or a bit sadder.

‘Crying At The Discotheque’ feels very prescient, doesn’t it?

Well, it’s a cover, one that samples Chic. It was released in the Noughties, and then I started doing it as a cover live – particularly in gay clubs, actually, we had a backing track made. I incorporated it into my set, but this is the first properly recorded version. It’s just a really, really clever song – it’s got this disco element, this Noughties element, and it tells a little story. And yes, ‘Crying At The Discotheque’ felt like a nice song to sing at the moment! It just felt right.

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‘Murder On The Dancefloor’ was back in the headlines last year with that Skepta sample, did it take you by surprise?

I have to approve it before it’s released, so I heard it when he finished it. I thought it was brilliant! I love having things sampled and reincorporated and reinvented… it’s really exciting. And he did something cool with it. I ended up singing it with him on Live Lounge, so we got to do it together. Really fun!

Are you anticipating this new album to channel 2020, then?

Whenever I write songs it’s not quite as conscious as that, anyway. It’s more that I’ll be in some sort of mood, and it’ll tumble out, and then I’ll look back and think: oh blimey, that was what it was about! I won’t necessarily know what it’s about when I’m writing. This is the third album that I’ve been doing with Ed Harcourt. We started it at the end of last year, and we picked it up again recently.

I’ve got things that I want to put into it – my step-dad sadly died at the end of July, so for my family that’s been a really big thing in our lives. I want to incorporate that, but I also want it to be a positive album – I want it to be optimistic. I’m writing stuff that is quite quirky and has different corners to it, but ultimately I want it to be something that is about looking for the light.

My instinct whenever things are quite heavy is to try and look for the light – I don’t like to wallow in stuff. There has to be a good message at the end of it.

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‘Songs From The Kitchen Disco’ is out now.

Words: Robin Murray
Photo Credit: Sophie Muller

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Live Preview: Pete Tong & The Heritage Orchestra Tour Dates Announced

Ibiza Classics show hits the road in 2021…

Pete Tong & The Heritage Orchestra, have announced a new string of dates for 2021 taking their Ibiza Clasics show conducted by James Buckle on the road around the UK,

A truly fascinating combination, the UK’s most influentional Dance DJ combining energies with a 65-piece orchestra and a spectacular visual live show.

First coming to fruition for the hugely succesful BBC Proms show at The Royal Albert Hall three years ago. 

A brilliant assault on the senses. Pete’s collaboration with the Heritage Orchestra went on to play arenas worldwide including two sold out nights at The O2, London,

The arena filling show live show also acted as a launch pad for the chart topping album ‘Classic House’ which reached number one in the U.K chart, and it’s follow up Pete Tong ‘Ibiza Classics’.

Highly recommended for ravers of all ages, this is both an education in dance music and a cracking night out to boot.

Tickets go on general sale this Friday November 20th.

Priority Tickets for O2 customers will be available here from this Wednesday 18th November at 9:00am on pre-sale ahead of general release.

Revisit last years sold out show at The O2, London

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Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Live Report: William Doyle – Oslo, London

A pandemic pick-me-up…

William Doyle gives those willing to venture out in a pandemic a vital blast of live music that proves as cathartic for the audience as it does the performer, writes Nico Franks.

“Thanks for risking your lives to come out and see me play,” isn’t the kind of sentence you’re used to hearing as a gig goer in the UK. But this is 2020 in a pandemic and this is how William Doyle introduces himself to the 40-or-so people sat in pairs at little tables in a 350-person capacity room.

“No singing and no dancing,” is also an unfamiliar rule to be told before you enter a gig but, again, this is 2020 and gig going is very, very different now. Whereas before sterile atmospheres were something to be avoided at gigs, these days they’re a requisite for them to go ahead.

It’s in this environment my flatmate and I sit down to watch William Doyle, playing the second night of his two night residency at Oslo, Hackney on a wet Saturday night in east London. Operating in a pandemic has seen the previously sweaty venue repurpose itself as a kind of vast jazz bar, with table service delivering cans of Red Stripe ordered via an app rather than cocktails.

Eight months ago, Doyle played COLOURS down the road in Hoxton, flanked on stage by a full band, including a saxophonist, having recently released Your Wilderness Revisited, an ambitious album in which the 29-year-old musician conjured up intense memories of his childhood growing up in suburbia in full, electronic technicolour.

Now, presumably for a whole host of reasons, Doyle is back to playing on his own, evoking the days when he played under the moniker East India Youth as a younger man, this time surrounded by house plants and foliage, the de facto accessories of our lives in lockdown.

Doyle is joining the likes of Taylor Swift and Paul McCartney in releasing an album recorded in the solitude of lockdown. He opens with two new songs, one of which involves lots of looping of instruments and lyrics, including the repeated refrain “I’m always dimming the light switch.” Domestic life has never loomed over us so much than over the past eight months and many of the new songs Doyle plays feature moments of harsh, atonal dissonance, perhaps in reaction to the unnerving quiet that hung in the air at the height of lockdown.

This transfers over to moments in songs from ‘Your Wilderness Revisited’ which, for what they’ve lost by not having a live drummer or saxophonist in the mix, gain from the evident catharsis Doyle feels from being able to play them live again. ‘Nobody Else Will Tell You’ feels particularly dynamic, as Doyle duets with himself, the powerful chords of his guitar rubbing up alongside his two keyboards and drum loop.

It’s a lot for one person to do and at times Doyle looks like he could do with a third arm. But the challenges of making a living as an artist in the UK these days are stark, as our government lurches from one catastrophe to another with arts and culture scenes up and down the country serving as collateral. It’s hard to imagine only the most already well-heeled and established bands turning much of profit when venues like Oslo have to operate at 12.5% of their capacity to put on a gig.

But William Doyle in a socially distanced room is infinitely better than no William Doyle at all, as one audience member makes clear when asked by the musician if tonight’s gig is a little too weird for comfort. And a quick scan of Twitter highlights how much tonight’s gig, and the one the evening before it, have meant to audiences.

Ever since Doyle switched to performing under his own name rather than EIY, the songs from his Mercury Music Prize-nominated back catalogue have been off the table when he’s performed live. Up until now, Doyle, to his credit, has preferred to look forward, rather than back.

But with so little to look forward to in 2020, it’s been nigh on impossible not to reflect on things. Tonight’s gig reflects this, with ‘CAROUSEL’ and ‘Heaven, How Long’, from EIY’s ‘CULTURE OF VOLUME’ and ‘Total Strife Forever’ respectively, getting rare live outings.

The latter, which introduced EIY to the world back in 2013, is the most affecting of all, losing none of its glorious bombast in the intervening years that its laid dormant. As it swells to its redemptive crescendo, propelled by a chainsaw guitar riff, Doyle asks the same question we’ve all been asking ourselves in recent months as the pandemic rolls on. And on. And on. Heaven, how long?

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Words: Nico Franks
Photo Credit: Eleonora C. Collini

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Black Country, New Road Announce Their Debut Album

'For the first time' lands on February 5th…

Black Country, New Road will release their debut album ‘For the first time’ on February 5th.

The band’s fantastic live shows have propelled them forwards, with a string of exceptional releases broadening their studio sound.

Snapped up by Ninja Tune, the group roped in producer Andy Savours for their debut album.

Recorded at the close of 2019 and the first weeks of lockdown, ‘For the first time’ lands early next year.

Out on February 5th, the album resonates with their live sound, encapsulating those fiery concerts.

Frontman Isaac Wood comments: “This is basically representative of our first 18 months”.

New song ‘Science Fair’ is online now – check it out below.

Finally, Black Country, New Road have confirmed plans for two socially distanced London shows:

November
20 London Islington Assembly Hall
21 London Islington Assembly Hall

Photo Credit: Max Grainger

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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“We’re Creating Our Lane With Beats” Clash Meets G4 Boyz

"A lot of people out there know what's going on…."

Staten Island brothers G4 Boyz (Buggy and Ice Baby) have been in the rap game for a minute and are now rapidly building a huge base of support: at home in NYC, across the Atlantic on our cold island, and beyond.

They’re currently pioneering the uproarious drill version of ‘Scam Rap’ which chronicles the occasional lows and outrageous highs of credit card fraud. For most UK listeners, our introduction to G4 Boyz was the infectious winter-time heater ‘Local Scammer’; over a pleasingly minimalist Drill production, the fraud-money-flexing and West African inflections of Buggy and Ice Baby were held together by London affiliate G4 Choppa’s raspy hook.

US artists sharing a platform with UK drillers was a standout development in transatlantic drill relations, pointing towards the brothers’ wider vision of organically shaping a global sound. Two further drill cuts followed; the anthemic ‘419’ and July’s hugely successful ‘Prada’ which once again platformed G4 Choppa’s knack for catchy hooks.

Superficially, the somewhat untapped subject matter of ‘Scam Rap’ might seem a strange one, but G4 Boyz are speaking to their lived experiences as young men of West African heritage in the belly of the beast, and if you scratch beneath the surface of their boasts and braggadocios, what you’re left with is music intended to uplift communities who are often left with little other choice but to hustle in order to flourish and thrive.

Clash caught up with them to discuss their journey. 

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For a lot of listeners in the UK, our intro to you guys was ‘Local Scammer’. The track was perfect because it was wintertime, everybody was hustling, trying to get their money up for Christmas! But you have been in the game for a long time. Tell us about your entry into music and how you got to where you’re at now.

G4 Buggy: We’ve been obviously grinding for a minute, but I won’t say we was giving it all we had, because we had one foot in the street and one foot in the music stuff. And when you’re doing it like that you don’t get the best results. I mean, that’s with anything, if you’re half-and-half with anything that you’re trying to do.

So, me personally, I just got to a point in my life a couple of years ago, maybe about two years ago, where I was kind of just empty man, like, I had a bunch of other money that I’d been saving up from just hustling. And I didn’t know what to do with it. I wouldn’t say that it was legal. So it was just me sitting there like, ‘man, what am I gonna do?’

I took that time to watch this documentary called The Secret and it was about manifesting what you want in life, and I also took that time to get closer to God. I said, ‘you know what, I’m gonna give this music thing, everything that we have,’ because I’m tired of just hustling and hustling, not knowing when the next dollar is gonna come in and looking at that money.

And then I went to my brother with this new revelation. He wasn’t with it. He was like ‘I’m not about to start doing shows for no $500, $1,000, $1500 dollars, man. I can make $10,000 , $15,000 in like one week!’ Music is very hard, you know? Everybody don’t win, everybody don’t make it. And I told him, ‘look, let’s do one more song. And if this does not work, I promise you can go and be the biggest hustler of all time. Go and be Scarface!’

So I found this beat. I gave it to him. And I told him like, ‘yo, go do what you have to do and come back with it.’ He came back with a song called ‘Patek Phillipe’ which ended up featuring Tory Lanez. That was the first time I actually saw a real light in this tunnel that we’d been travelling in, and that’s when we started to take music seriously and then boom!

About a year later we ended up signing this artist called G4 Choppa, because we’d seen that the UK movement was picking up pace very hard. But me and my brother have always been into the UK movement, three years ago we did a song with Blade Brown.

He’s a legend in the streets!

G4 Buggy: He’s a legend! He reached out to us because of us doing what we do out here and real hustlers connect. So when that happened, we dropped that song and the video, he flew out to America. So many people were saying, ‘why you got this guy with a British accent on your song?’ I was just shocked like, ‘y’all don’t even know, the UK scene is crazy.’

So to see New York people take UK drill beats but don’t collaborate with the artists … I was like ‘nah, y’all crazy!’ So we ended up signing G4 Choppa, who reached out to my brother Ice and we ended up moulding him for a good seven to eight months, just kind of letting him be more prepared for the American sound but also kind of moulding a sound where it could be appealing to both crowds, without losing his sound.

That’s when we came up with ‘Local Scammer’ and we was ready to go!

Are you finding music as a lifestyle more fulfilling than hustling?

G4 Ice: Honestly, like my brother said if it’s not about our lifestyle, I don’t want to do the music. If you notice with ‘Local Scammer’ it’s very different compared to regular drill. Because we’re giving you elements of our life you know, us being African, coming over here, giving you African Scam Drill that’s never been done before, the blend that we’re doing. And people know, especially in the UK, y’all know the deal. A lot of people out there know what’s going on. But they don’t speak about it. So we want to be the people at the forefront to come and speak about what’s going on. If we can’t blend our lifestyle with the music, we don’t want to do the music. For me, it’s gotta come organically. That’s what it is for me.

Drill is definitely the current texture for rap in the UK and the US. As rappers who have rapped on all kinds of productions, what’s the specific appeal of a drill beat?

G4 Ice: I mean the original drill came from Chicago with Chief Keef and guys like that. For me, we know how Chicago drill beats go, we know how UK drill beats go.

Now with me hopping on a drill beat, I didn’t hop on it because it was a drill beat. When I hop on it, I wanna make it mine. We want to come and do this thing different. I’m gonna come give you a UK dude. I’m gonna give you an African boy from New York City. I’ma blend everything. I want to give you something different. I can’t really say what a drill beat is because now we’re creating our lane with beats.

G4 Buggy: You nailed it. It started in Chicago, then migrated to New York with Bobby Schmurda. Then after that it went to the UK and you guys took it and made it your own! And the same thing with New York, so it’s like it’s like music in general. There’s always evolution to it.

So, like my brother said, we take anything and we make it ours, we want you to hear about what we’re doing and how we’re doing it. Most of the time when you hear drill artists, they talking about spinning the block and doing this and doing that. I mean, we could do that because we’ve been through that.

But let’s talk about a whole topic that no one ever speaks about. It’s like this dark cloud that no one ever speaks about. And we’re gonna do it in an appealing way.

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You touched on it before, but tell us a bit more about how the relationship with G4 Choppa came about.

G4 Ice: G4 Choppa reached out to me like a minute ago, a while back. We actually named him G4 Choppa. With me and my brother, when it comes to making music, you know with all the talent that God has blessed us with, we’re like what are we going to do to make the world say, ’yo, this is different!’ I feel some artists don’t want to mess with UK artists because of the way they deliver their sound.

It’s kind of hard for US artists to actually get what you’re saying or actually take it seriously. We put Choppa through artist development. We actually signed him before any type of records [were released]. We actually went through and coached him, at the same time being like ‘do not leave who you are behind.

We want n****s to know that you’re UK but you’ve been in Brooklyn, you’ve been over here. Let n****s know that we know what’s going on.’ You know, that’s how it came about.

He’s signed to your label. Have you got any other UK artists that you’re currently developing?

G4 Buggy: Yeah, but honestly our main focus right now is G4 Choppa. That’s why we’ve been trying to keep on doing records with him, because we know we have a platform. When he reached out to my brother Ice he had like 70 followers.

G4 Ice: 60 followers to be exact!

G4 Buggy: Okay, 60 followers to be exact. And now he has 10,000 followers in a matter of months. So we want to just focus on him right now, so he can be able to have his own platform, cos’ right now he’s still working on it. And we are too, but we want to keep sharing it with him. So when it’s time for him to officially release his single under the G4 imprint, it could be massive. So we have this little game plan that we’re running right now.

Is Choppa of West African descent too?

G4 Ice: Yeah he’s of African descent, from West Africa.

Cool. A thing that really stands out is your celebration of West African identity in your bars. This is prominent in Black British music at the moment. Is that the case in the US, or is it not so welcoming?

G4 Buggy: No, it’s definitely not. I mean, we are kind of just setting that trend now. I would say we are like the forefathers of appreciating your African roots. I’m not saying others haven’t done it. Honestly, it’s different when artists have been in the game for 10, 15 years and they do it in a more enlightened way, which is the best way, but we’re doing it in a way where this is our truth in the hood, what’s going on, what’s happening right now.

We all want that Martin Luther King Dream, but right now, what’s going on, not just for Africans, but most foreigners. When you think about it, being a foreigner, we’re all fighting for the same thing, we all go through the same thing. You all get looked at the same way most of the time.

Most of all, we wanted to make records that a younger version of ourselves would listen to. Because when we was going through what we was going through at a younger age, there was no songs that we could put on to pick us up, to make us feel better when people used to call us ‘African booty scratcher’ and ‘you stink’. We didn’t have nobody to say, ‘African boy got money. African boy got style.’ There was nobody to say that to us.

So we grew up hating everybody that didn’t like us. Now there’s a 13 year old kid, 14 year old kid, who can be like, ‘man, I feel good to be African. I feel good to be Asian,’ or whatever your culture is. It’s basically foreign empowerment music man. That’s what we’re doing over here and hopefully it rubs off on other artists who wanna do the same.

I think that’s why your music has been so embraced in London. We’ve got so many communities that need uplifting … so when my dad left Egypt and touched road in London, he was definitely scamming, just to stay alive! Has scamming always been a topic in your bars?

G4 Ice: If you come to New York, you know the deal if you say G4 Boyz. Ask Blade Brown! I don’t want to brag like I got this thing locked down but they’re going to tell you.

Like my brother was saying, first of all I didn’t want to do music because the simple fact was I was already doing this play right here, to go do music and get caught up in a situation, that was stupid to me. Two is whatever these rappers actually have, like we had we had it.

We had Patek Phillipe watches before these rappers was actually talking about it, so I’m like ‘bro, there’s really no point to it.’ So that’s why when he said, ‘bro, we have to make a change,’ if you notice in the song ‘Patek Phillipe’ I was like yo, if I’m going to do something, we have to be ourselves and let the people know what’s going on. So in the song we say, ‘I be scamming on the low’.

G4 Buggy: You gotta give them baby food, slowly, until they get it, you know? Before, we used to make music for other people and my brother kind of said, ‘look if you want me to do music, we’re gonna do it our way, talking about what we want to talk about, especially if we’re not doing it anymore.’

You did a London show in Camden before coronavirus really messed everything up. Tell us about the vibe at the show.

G4 Ice: It was crazy man, crazy!

G4 Buggy: I was kind of nervous because it was our first time doing a show outside of the country. And, um, you always feel the energy from the UK in terms of support, but to put up tickets and to sell out in three, four days, it was like ‘wow’! It was a crazy feeling. To go out there and then to get a text from A$AP Rocky like, ‘yo, man, I heard you got a show tonight. I’m coming!’ I was like ‘yeah, okay’! I was already building a relationship with Tion Wayne, and he wanted to come out. It just magically happened, all praise God you know.

You guys are so raw with your energy like y’all really jump around. Y’all don’t stand around chillin’. Y’all get dirty, y’all bust heads, man! It was really dope to have all that come together.

The latest drop ‘Prada’ has been another massive track. It did big numbers in Ghana and Nigeria too. Is the plan for you to take your sound global?

G4 Buggy: Yeah, organically though, you know? We’re not trying to fit in, we’re not trying to go over there and say, ‘hey, look at us.’ We’re just doing what we do and letting people see what we do, because one thing we realised is that you can’t go chasing down things, you have to just be yourself and continue to grow organically.

I truly believe God will bless you with that energy. So it’s dope to see that your own home team is supporting you amongst African giants. I mean, being number one on iTunes and Burna Boy is number two, shout out to Burna Boy though! Being number one in Ghana and Sarkodie is number three. These are all legends in their own right, so to be number one for that moment is definitely God’s blessing.

G4 Ice: That’s right, like my brother said we’re doing things organically. We’re not trying to push it to where it’s supposed to be pushed but whatever God is saying and doing for us, we gonna do it man. We’re just here to show them our culture. So yeah, it’s a blessing … praise God.

How important is your faith when you’re making music?

G4 Buggy: Yeah, everything that we do, man, like we really built a strong relationship with our God. Obviously what we’re writing about is what we’ve been through, what we have experienced. It’s just giving a soundtrack to people who go through things, because you cannot ignore what’s out there. To take our personal experiences and to write it down and to let other people enjoy them in the way they do, that’s a blessing.

What are your future plans? Is there an EP coming? More collaborations with UK artists in the pipeline?

G4 Ice: Yeah man, most likely if everything goes well and we get to drop it by God’s grace, it’s called ‘SCAM’ as an acronym for ‘still chasing after money’. Me and my brother man, of course we got flavours.

G4 Buggy: All I’m gonna say is shout out to all the people out there in the UK, shout out NSG, shout out to Tion Wayne, of course shout out to A$AP Rocky. We got something special coming, it’s gonna be crazy when you hear A$AP Rocky on a record talking about scam! Just get ready man.

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Words: Robert Kazandjian

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Forage With Me: Clash Meets otta

The remarkable new artist on her bold project 'Songbook'…

‘Songbook’, out now, is the second EP from British-Finnish artist otta, whose eclectic organised chaos pulls you in with a mix of skittering electronics over the top of lo-fi R&B. After writing, recording, creating the EP artwork, and producing it almost all by herself, this record is undoubtedly personal.

“I definitely write about my experience and the experiences of those close to me, feeling sad and generally not OK at this age is something that I try to pull from.”

‘hope extension’ perhaps embodies this the most, with drifting lyricism such as “I’ll get existential with friends” over stripped back piano melodies. Her voice shakes and echoes in its rawest form; “nothing feels like family anymore, no one feels close to me anymore, everything volatile, vulnerable, don’t connect with anyone, spiralin’.” Track ‘suihku’ however, follows straight after, acting as a palette cleanser with its amalgamation of overstimulating clashes and rattling. 

Learning to produce via garage band, friends she met at the BRIT school, and through acting mentor and Kwes who mixed and did additional production on the EP, otta still has a lot to learn on that front.

“I feel that I still don’t really know what I’m doing, just winging it. It’s never-ending – there is always something more to know. Kwes understands production so well that it’s just amazing to see him work and I am so lucky to work with him.”

Clash caught up with otta during lockdown for her first-ever interview, where we discussed escaping to Finland, foraging tips, and feeling downright melancholy.

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What is your lead single ‘never see’ about?

This song is about over romanticising having someone out there but you can’t really see them or see the possibility of them because you’re so caught up in your own negative space. When you’re not in a good place, there are things you could do to help yourself out eg. you could speak to someone, and there is so much good around you, but you can’t see that and you don’t know how to help yourself because you’re surrounded in bad vibes.

The song itself I think sounds so fun but at the heart of it, it’s kind of sad. It’s actually peak. You can’t see all your good when you’re surrounding yourself and harbouring the bad.

You have mentioned your love for artists such as Kanye and David Bowie. How do you feel about being able to separate artists work from their shitty actions?

I remember hearing ‘My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy’ as a child and being like ohhhh shit. Everything that Kanye was putting out there was so much depth to it and visually as well, I just remember listening to it and feeling so grown up and far away from anything else I’d heard. It changed the way I thought about music, and I still listen to him quite a lot. I just how he takes ideas really far. I try to do that in my music, push things as far as they will go.

However, I have definitely thought about this. It’s fucked up, and fuck Kanye for the way he’s been behaving. I think I can separate, and clearly, I have done that, I’ve listened to artists despite the problematic things they have done.

You would never, for example, listen to an R Kelly song, there’s no way. I think there is a line you don’t cross but you tend to justify it for the acts that you like. But it is important to hold artists accountable for the actions. PERIOD.

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With your mum being Finnish and having grandparents living in Finland, you spent long summers there as a child. Do you feel that this influenced your creativity as a musician at all?

It definitely did. I used to do loads of creative stuff with my sister, we would play outside all the time, make songs and paint shit. We had quite a lot of freedom to do whatever. I was really encouraged to make stuff, my mum is very creative and my family have always been supportive of me wanting to make music.

Finland is just such a beautiful place, its so magical I can’t even describe it. Living in England and then going there, always knowing that place is there, speaking Finnish and having my grandparents there – it’s like a whole other world I have that no one knows about. It’s a magic place that I love.

As children there was a bit of forest we call the magic forest, we would go there and pick berries and mushrooms. It’s just such a different life to England.

Do you find you are more inspired in everyday London life or when you are in Finland in your creative haven?

I’m more inspired to write when I’m feeling shit, so yeah in London for sure. However, being in Finland is definitely a good place to work on songs because you get a new perspective, say you’ve written a song when you’re feeling down in London, then you’re in Finland just on your laptop making it better.

I work on stuff there all the time. There’s a little spot on top of the garage, and I take a microphone with me up there. When I was living and working in London and I was just not OK, I just went to Finland on my own, filmed my first video, and was free to do whatever I wanted, because there’s just no one around. It’s like an escape almost that is constantly inspiring.

I also made the artwork for the cover in Finland, it is all stuff that I took pictures of round the house. The silhouette of my face is something that my grandparents have in their bedroom, and I also took a picture of this plate that I used to eat off every day as a kid. When I put them together, I didn’t want to change it because it is so personal to me. When I showed it to my gran she recognised it all and was so happy. That is really important to me.

Do you wish that you could be in Finland for lockdown?

Lowkey, yes. I keep thinking of going, trying to figure out a way to quarantine there but I’ve just got to stay put really.

As soon as the album is out maybe I should bun it and just go! Everyone is in their houses anyway, maybe I could do some live streams and tutorials like how to make a basket out of twigs. I would watch that. Exclusive content: Tune into to my live stream to hear my songs and also learn valuable foraging skills.” There’s something in that.

God, maybe I should? It can be titled “Forage with me.”

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‘Songbook’ EP is out now.

Words: Megan Warrender
Photo Credit: Rosie Atkin

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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HAIM Announce Massive Arena Shows For 2021

Here's how you can get tickets…

HAIM have announced a string of massive arena shows for next summer.

The band’s new album ‘Women In Music Pt. 3’ is out now, with the sisters smashing their way to No. 1 spot on the UK charts.

All touring plans are being pushed to next year, but 2021 is set to bring a leap into the unknown – a full arena tour.

Hitting Glasgow, Cardiff and more, HAIM will also play a night at London’s O2 Arena on June 18th.

Selected dates have a pre-sale, with tickets going on general sale from 10am on Friday (August 7th).

 

 

 

 

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the ONE MORE HAIM uk tour 2021 Presale starts Wednesday 8/5 General onsale Friday 8/7 For more info go to haimtheband.com who’s ready to see wimpiii live?

A post shared by HAIM (@haimtheband) on

Jul 31, 2020 at 8:01am PDT

Catch HAIM at the following shows:

June 
15 + 16 Manchester O₂ Victoria Warehouse
18 London The O2
19 Nottingham Motorpoint Arena
22 Glasgow The SSE Hydro
23 Cardiff Motorpoint Arena

Photo Credit: Keith Oshiro

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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In Conversation: Desta French

Latin flavour with a UK slant…

Up until recently, London’s cultural backdrop has lacked a mainstream Latin flavour. The community really began establishing themselves in the nineties, increasing four-fold since 2001. But what happens when the kids grow up? You get a new generation — nurtured on the language and music of their parents, but raised with the lingua franca of their hometown. You get a community that is no longer invisible. You get Desta French.

Desta personifies a new era of Latinx creatives in the city. She’s about to wrap up production on her upcoming EP San Lazarus, in which bi-lingual singles like ‘Guajira’, ‘Into The Wave’, and the newly-released ‘Aguanta’ make use of Latin guitar melodies or salsa rhythms before switching into R&B, pop and – in Aguanta’s case – rap.

But unlike what we’re used to hearing from America, Desta injects that irresistible London attitude into the mix, making her singles eclectic, experimental, and new. Both Latinos in the UK and in South America are putting her tracks on repeat; carving out a space for her community to thrive and share their experiences growing up in Britain.

On the release of ‘Aguanta’, Clash spoke with Desta over the phone about her EP, writing in both Spanish and English, and the need for more Latinx role models in the UK.

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Where are you right now?

In Camden, where I grew up. I’ve left the house for a quick walk… And I’ve just approached the steps by Granary Square in King’s Cross. It’s beautiful. I love London. Wait, I’m going to send a picture.

Your upcoming EP, ‘San Lazarus’ has a uniquely London sound, even though it’s characterised by Latin influences.

Well, I’m a product of my environment. I love experimenting with my influences – growing up here with a Latin background, and marrying that to the sounds of the city. That’s why the EP felt so personal to me.

I mean, we even produced a drill song where I sing Spanish over the beat. So, I’d imagine this to be a different experience for my listeners and fans, one which really encapsulates who I am as an artist but which people in London identify with, too.

Wait… A Latin drill song? Awesome. What are some of things you wanted to say with this latest EP?

Representation is one side of it. But the lyrics really tried to capture how I was feeling after my last relationship. The main narratives are: falling in love, lust, and having to watch it end before seeing where it could’ve gone.

It felt like therapy writing this, to be honest — getting it out, whether its love, pain, or pushing through, and being able to reconnect with yourself. My latest single, ‘Aguanta’ means ‘endurance’. It’s really about letting go, trusting in nature and divine providence. Themes like tragedy and lust come naturally to me when I write in a Latin headspace, in particular.

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Did switching between languages help you get these messages across?

You know, I found that it helps explore more with the song’s melody. When I write in Spanish it has more of a poetic – maybe even romantic – weight. It comes out naturally on tracks written along a guitar…

Spanish evokes this pain more profoundly. In English, I am more direct. I guess it’s me as a Londoner talking. I think you get a sense for that in ‘Guajira’ or ‘Into the Wave’ where it flips from Latin to a UK RnB sound. The language is a big part of guiding the listener between both worlds, both vibes. A lot of people in the industry suggested writing in Spanish was a bad move, actually, on account they assumed there would be no audience.

People don’t really know what to do with UK Latin music as it’s such a new thing. But for me, releasing songs in Spanish was bound to happen sooner or later — it is an inevitable part of my journey as an artist with Latin roots. So, I didn’t really pay them much attention, and decided I’d navigate my own way through releasing this music.

There are big, important conversations around representation at the moment. Did you feel that you had a statement to make?

I didn’t set out with a point to make specifically about Latin representation, but now I’m really invested. Latinos in the UK are often missing from conversations in the media, so I’m glad to be a storyteller for this movement. Identity is now at the forefront of my thoughts.

Growing up Latin in the UK is sort of a detached experience. It’s nothing like it is in the US, where the community is much prominent. I never got to see a UK-born Latino in the media growing up. You know, we all used to Selena’s music and watch J-Lo on TV – but it felt far removed from us, and it’s important to have these role models closer to home.

We see Latin culture exploding around the world, the success of reggaeton… Yet, there’s so many exciting things happening here in London, too. 

– – –

– – –

That’s true. I can’t really name many UK Latin musicians…

Don’t get me wrong: there were people doing big things with salsa and hip hop in the noughties, like Mike Kalle. But, you know, there has also been a habit of mirroring everything that are working in America – and the way that community were making music – rather than looking a bit deeper into our own identity and experimenting with sounds from home.

Until recently, there wasn’t really a way of Latinos finding each other, though, or meet likeminded musicians and artists – but social media is really changing that.

Is this what you’re setting out to do with your ‘Chattin’ Latin’ interview series?

It’s been so heart–warming to gather Latinx women around the country and give them a platform to share their stories. Honestly, we’re kind of invisible in the media, and yet the community is like the eighth largest ethnic minority in London?

Many of us are dispersed around the UK, too. One girl had actually never met another Latin person her own age, and yet what they see at school and home is so uniquely different that they may feel obliged to ignore their heritage. They feel left out. But that’s going to change — we have so much potential creatively, and it’s only a matter of time.

– – –

– – –

Back to the EP, what kind of reaction have you got from people who have been listening to each of the singles?

It’s amazing, everyone’s been really positive and commenting on the experimental sound — which is really, really nice for me as an artist. But you know what’s especially cool, what really makes me feel validated? It’s when strangers from South America get in touch and say, ‘hey, I loved your music!’ I had someone from Argentina contact me about ‘Into The Wave’ a short while ago and her comment warmed my heart…

As much as I go on about being Latinx, when I’m in South America visiting family I am a Londoner. Their acceptance means something to me… It’s crazy (laughs) when I was last out there, I was invited – to my surprise – to speak with a popular Colombian talk show host about my song-writing. I was so baffled.

So, you’ve managed to have some big cross-over appeal…

Well… When you’re producing music in Spanish, I guess they’re more willing to listen — once this whole pandemic is over, I’m definitely looking to tour South America. But even here in London, people have been super down with these songs, even if they don’t understand the Spanish. Something about the music speaks with them…

This EP is honestly the first body of work that I feel really proud of. I’ve had a chance to explore my historical and musical influences, and feel closer to finding my voice as an artist (porque non?) Even if it’s something completely different, at least I know I’ve been true to myself.

– – –

– – –

Words: Chris Cotonou

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Grace Inspace Explores Shifts In Her Life With ‘Off The Grid’

Check out her new video…

Grace Inspace has come a long way, both emotionally and physically.

Raised on a rural outpost somewhere in California, she’s drifted across the States, travelling the Atlantic, before winding up in London.

She’s still processing those changes, and last year’s introductory EP ‘Lazy Grace’s Apocalyptic Kitchen, pt. 1’ was fuelled by this process.

A follow up is incoming, with Grace Inspace ready to share her glorious new song ‘Off The Grid’.

A song that connects both sides of the Atlantic, it was kicked off in LA before being nailed down in London.

She comments: “This song is born of two worlds and a pick up truck. It was recorded in a home studio in Los Angeles with one of my drumming heroes Stephan Perkins sitting in before all this started melting down. Now is the time for this song, these worlds are colliding; there is a great learning going on.”

“I live somewhere between central London and an extremely rural outpost in California, where the pot plants grow high and the second amendment posters sit amicably alongside rainbow flags. Peace and tolerance!”

We’re able to share the video, an imaginative, narrative-driven tale. Grace continues:

“This is a fever dream, a premonitory vision; a nurse leaving the city to try to heal the earth with her underfunded supplies, wrapping dead trees with duct tape and pressing band-aids into the soil, It’s the tale of urbanites craving wide open spaces, plots of land and free-flowing rivers, of shamans who are out of answers, of living home-free, of smashing up the grid and starting fresh.”

Tune in now.

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Sophie Kilburn’s ‘Call Home’ Finds Expression In Melody

It's about moving to the big city…

Sophie Kilburn knew she was leaving a lot behind – she just didn’t realise how much.

The songwriter moved from her home in a countryside valley last year, relocating to London in pursuit of her dreams.

It’s taken her a step close in some regards, but it’s also been a challenging process, removing her from the familiar and plunging into the strange.

New song ‘Call Home’ is about this process, looking at how the strain placed on her may have been worth it after all.

“‘Call Home’ is about the inner turmoil of wanting to achieve your aspirations but your emotions and mind not letting you,” she says. “Like so many I moved to a big city (London) from a small town in a countryside valley to pursue my dreams.”

“It is so true that crowded places can be the loneliest. Like so many I have had problems with my mental health and I felt almost ashamed of feeling down. Now more than ever there is so much uncertainty and anxiety I just wanted to encourage people to call home and not suffer in silence.”

Expressed in a beautifully melodic way, ‘Call Home’ marks this alt-pop songwriter out as something special, someone working with confidence and assurance.

Tune in now.

Photo Credit: Joe Lindsay

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Cavetown’s ‘I Miss My Mum’ Has A Heartwarming New Video

His album 'Sleepyhead' is out now…

Cavetown has shared the lovely video for his song ‘I Miss My Mum’.

The DIY alt-popper is currently hunkered down at his flat in London, only a short distance from his native Oxford.

Lockdown, though, means that he is separated from his family, so he’s decided to share a new video.

A highly from recent album ‘Sleepyhead’, ‘I Miss My Mum’ has taken on a fresh poignancy, especially when added to his childhood photos.

He says:

“Really wishing I could give my mum a big hug right now, so I made a new video for my song ‘I Miss My Mum’, off my new album ‘Sleepyhead’. Hope u like it :)).”

Watch it below.

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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JPEGMAFIA x Denzel Curry Spar On This ‘Bald!’ Remix

Watch the lockdown inspired visuals…

JPEGMAFIA spars with Denzel Curry on a newly released ‘Bald!’ remix.

Peggy’s new album ‘All My Heroes Are Cornballs’ is out now, capping a remarkable year for the Baltimore rapper.

Recently stopping off in London for some sold out shows – before lockdown, mind – he also spruced up album cut ‘Bald!’ for a remix.

Denzel Curry features on the new cut, and it comes complete with a video filmed amid self-isolation.

DIY aesthetics delivered with a tongue in cheek vibe, you can check it out below.

Join us on the ad-free creative social network Vero, as we get under the skin of global cultural happenings. Follow Clash Magazine as we skip merrily between clubs, concerts, interviews and photo shoots. Get backstage sneak peeks, exclusive content and access to Clash Live events and a true view into our world as the fun and games unfold.

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Fiddler’s Green – Victor And His Demons Lyrics

When I came up to London, I saw him in town
He was having a drink, he clearly looked really down
He got a whiskey , and that was his doom
I thought it was time to help him out of his gloom

He said, “What the hell now, what should I do?”
I said, “What went wrong? This drink is for you!”
He screamed out really high and hat was far out of tune
The waitress looked weird as she entered the room

Victor and his demons are going to town
So better watch out, stop your dreaming, he’s fooling around
Check out all your feelings if you don’t have a clue
Victor and his demons are looking for you

Victor and his demons
Watch out, stop your dreaming

He asked, “Better to let her be, better to grab her now
What shoult I do?”
I said, “Better to let her be, better to grab her – that’s all up to you”
Better to let her be, better to grab her
Or better to get her or better to let her
He got it in tune as she entered the room

“What the hell! Why does she look so damned pretty
And why does she smile so f*cking awesome at me?”

And then he said, “Hey!”, he said, “Hey!”, he said, “Hey!”

Victor and his demons are going to town
So better watch out, stop your dreaming, he’s fooling around
Check out all your feelings if you don’t have a clue
Victor and his demons are looking for you

One for Pete and two for Paul
One for Pat to make him fall

One for Pete and two for Paul
One for Pat to make him fall

One for Pete
Two for Paul

Victor and his demons are going to town
So better watch out, stop your dreaming, he’s fooling around
Check out all your feelings if you don’t have a clue
Victor and his demons are looking for you

Victor and his demons
Watch out, stop your dreaming
Check out all your feelings
Victor and his demons are looking for you

Noname – With You Lyrics

[Verse]
This is my happy ever suicide
My hands tied behind my breast
My silhouette did pirouettes
The curtains are closing
My baby was my ooh-lah lah, neverlasting
My baby was my cry me rivers and shadow casket
Who could be my lovely, my lovely?
Who could be my only one, my only?
I’m almost just as empty as you think I am, a penny for your thoughts
A wooden hair of happiness, a pretty Ricky Ross
A may-black music, I woke up in my sympathy, became black Judas
All my everythings for sale
All my second hand discoveries, Dungarees faded pale
All my halfway hallelujahs are tippy-toed in the mail
All the fluctuations on scales
And the missing therapy sessions of bullies treating me well
Well, we don’t drink that
If it ain’t the top shelf, nigga you can keep that
Share my life on Telefone, I’m 25 at 306, and 809 became my home
Gave you a taste of my redemption and now I want my drink back
Somebody hold me like I’m almost enough
Somebody told me pray for heaven, saw how tiny it was
Little love from me, we can build this home alone
Alone
Forever with you, forever with you
I’m a home away from home and promise you’ll keep this secret
And promise you won’t forgive me to tell you that smells like peaches
He who leeches on love is a lame, chains and left her for London
Wireless festival reparable, so good when he wasn’t

Young Thug – I’m On Lyrics

[Intro: Young Thug]
Aye
We got London on da Track
You should loosen up a little bit
Girl, you should loosen up a little bit
I just thought
You should know
Thought that you should know
It’s a whole new world
You can be my girl
You should know
Foreign, we could go
Got a lil’ molly and coke
Use your nose
Gotta use your nose
Use your nose
Got a lil’ molly and coke
But you gotta use your nose
Fee-fi-fo
G.I. Joe
We can go high as skies go
Oh, yeah, yeah, yeah
I never seen no bitch that won’t go on a UFO
Ay, ay, oh
Yikes, I know, aye

[Hook: Young Thug]
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
My bag and me, a bunch on
No more public homes, mama
We on, on
Turn the crunch on, I gotta stay on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I been racin’ from the start
Only [?] park the car, yeah

[Verse 1: Young Thug]
Me and you should roll
We should go
I ain’t washin’ my clothes
I’d buy these new clothes
I’d rather buy new clothes
Saint Laurent on my toes
Fifty racks in the store
Fifty more in my coat
Big bank Slime, ho
Spent one or two dimes on her
I spend time with the owners
Big bank, Slime owner
We a different breed
We just tryna succeed
Got some diamonds on my teeth
Tell me who do it like me?
I’m ’bout to tease it
First, I gotta eat it
I got my reasons
I got some reasons
Everyone ’round me bleedin’
Yeah, the top floor of the Four Seasons
I was this close to servin’ them keys
Now twenty hoes on they knees

[Hook: Young Thug]
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
My bag and me, a bunch on
No more public homes, mama
We on, on
Turn the crunch on, I gotta stay on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I been racin’ from the start
Only [?] park the car

[Verse 2: YoungBoy Never Broke Again]
Hope your girlfriend got on green, ah
Hit a lick in all black, Reebok
Come down the block in a tank top
And y’all gon’ kill the scene, yeah
Need the money just for what I fiend, yeah
I’ma try just ’bout everything, yeah
I’ma go all out for the green, yeah
I’ma ball out with my team, yeah
I’ma pull up in a ‘vette (skrrt, skrrt)
You know that I’m reppin’ my set (I’m reppin’ my set)
I just hopped out the jet, yeah
Now I’m headed to the check, yeah
Whole lotta money right up in my jeans
I’ma get up and go get what I need
Beat the game, somethin’ like Billie Jean
Mixin’ red in a pint with the green
Hit the gas, I’ma tear up the scene
[?], you ain’t tryin’ me
Walked in with a slime with me
Hit up Ellie for a brand new ring

[Verse 3: Young Thug]
Yeah, bails like south, yeah
Dick in her mouth, yeah
‘Bout to fuck her on the couch, yeah
Fuck her slow like slouch, yeah
‘Bout to get in my mouth, yeah
Hopped from Ferrari to couch, yeah
Bankhead bounce, yeah
None of my diamonds got clout
I got a car in the house like couch
I got a key to your main bitch house
I steer the Rolls Royce today, ain’t feel like gettin’ rained out
Philippe’s on me today
I got a bitch, I ain’t trustin’ her mouth
I ’bout to kick shit sideways right now
‘Bout to say something right now
I got a pill in my stomach right now
I got a lotta new money right now
Blue face, hunnid by the low
Inside out, white nose
Hol’ up, baby girl, move
Everybody cut my bros
Put my dick in her nose
They might pass that hoe to my bros
I got 20-dollar bills, we cold
Got five, put it right up in her nose, yeah
I know she about the green hoe, yeah
Got Jeffery workin’ on these hoes, yeah
Eenie, miney, mo, which one I’m ’bout to floss
Eenie, miney, mo, which one don’t got draws
I’ma pinky roll, pass her to the dawg
Scottie pimp these hoes, show ’em Michael Jordan
All my diamonds bought without the clout
I put it up as if it was a drought
New York niggas call me without a doubt
I’ma ride for ’em like we at the house, uh
Ain’t got a beat in my trunk, yeah
Like factories, I gon’ ride these cars, yeah
Ride a Maybach like a hump, yeah
Backseat turn to a bunk, yeah
I take a trip to ya chain gang, I wanna go to ya compound
Love for every rich nigga except Donald Trump, yeah
All these rap niggas daddy
I should buy some Vans
Money long as a caddy, yeah
All these rap niggas daddy
I should invest in vans
I don’t do no dabbin’ fresher than some ranch

[Hook: Young Thug]
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
My bag and me, a bunch on
No more public homes, mama
We on, on
Turn the crunch on, I gotta stay on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I’m on, on
I been racin’ from the start
Only [?] park the car

Dapper Dan – 2 Step Skank lyrics

[Hook]
Two step skank,
Two step skank,
Two step skank,
Two step skank,

[Verse 1]
Ayyy,
I’m an English dude with an English groove,
Fuck dabbin’ in the club I’ve got an English move.

I’m a uk man, a big 2 step fan (Are you ready for the Dapper Dan man).
Let me tell you about uk “G” and how uk “G” has inspired me.
Two step to the girl with the two step walk,
Check out my skank, we don’t need no talk.

With a little bit of luxury, Ma garage girl.
21 Sec’s to get to the hotel.
Imagine I was sorry for the things I said,
I gotta get through this, get her to the bed.

Do you really like it when I give you what I love,
Am I moving to fast with my 12 inch dove.
She likes the way that I fill her in,
Right about now wanna hear you sing.

[Hook] (x2)
Two step skank, (Come check out my 2 step skank)
Two step skank, (You’re not ready for my 2 step skank)
Two step skank, (Come check out my 2 step skank)
Two step skank, (You’re not ready for my 2 step skank)

[Verse 2]
Now you wanna get more? Flip up the script and go 4×4,
My donk plays so get the encore, when I drop this one on any dance floor.
And I keep on reppin’, from London to Manny we keep 2 steppin’
Snapchat blowin up everybody checking, I am the teacher and this is the
Lesson.

I remember when I was at school, I smoked the reefer tryna act cool,
It was a battle being the class fool, now this little man is showing them
All.
This tune here is bound for the reload, we bring joy everywhere that we go,

7 days a week I’m doin’ my thing, right about now let me hear you sing.

[Hook] (x2)
Two step skank, (Come check out my 2 step skank)
Two step skank, (You’re not ready for my 2 step skank)
Two step skank, (Come check out my 2 step skank)
Two step skank, (You’re not ready for my 2 step skank)

Martin Brygmann – Fuck Nu Har Jeg Glemt Mit Kort lyrics

Jeg har booket bord på endnu en restaurant
Glæd jer til en outstanding Chateaubriand
Tung Grand Cru-klasse med kokasse-ouverture
Vi ska’ en tur til Frankrig, og den bli’r pissedyr

‘pagne med brus
Og så i spa/wellness
Saltscrub og gus
Cigaren er tændt og
Limoen venter natten lang

Fuck, nu har jeg glemt mit kort
Lægger du ud, så’ du krafteddermame en snut
Nu skal vi i byen for hårdt
Gi’r du entréen, 5 shots og en flaske sprut?

Morgenmad i London, frokost i Dubai
(bye bye)
Du vælger bare en kjole – hvad der passer dig
Gucci, Louis Vuitton, eller en Jean-Paul Gaultier
Og hvis du er i tvivl, så får du dem alle tre

Fjorten karat
Tingel-tangel om halsen
Prinsessen er smart
Du’ mindblowing skøn
Og der kommer han med regningen

Fuck, nu har jeg glemt mit kort
Lægger du ud, så’ du krafteddermame en snut
Nu skal vi i byen for hårdt
Gi’r du entréen, 5 shots og en flaske sprut?

Fuck, nu har jeg glemt mit kort
Lægger du ud…

Quality time med far
I får sgu 12 kugler i jeres vaffelis
Turpas, I løber bare
Kærligheden kender ingen pris

Fuck, nu har jeg glemt mit kort
Og jeg er sikker på jeg havde det lige før da jeg gik hjemmefra
Fuck, nu har jeg glemt mit kort
Jeg må ha’ tabt, jeg må ha’ tabt det… et sted
Fuck, nu har jeg glemt mit kort
Åhr! Det skete også sidste weekend!
Fuck, nu har jeg glemt mit kort
Der må være gået hul i min lomme

RAYE – Ambition lyrics

(feat. Stormzy)

[Verse 1: Raye]
In August, I’m staring at rain clouds
A descendant of London
I watch as people are falling like rain
Encouraged to seek other options
I don’t need other options
You either eat it or you spit it out
You’re either silent or you run your mouth
You breathe in or you breathe out
I’m so cold but the sun’s up
Like it’s winter all year, oh
So welcome you to it now
Oh, wait, that was my sound
Could you dig it up or sweat it out?
Could you give it up and sit down?
But after that, I hope you know your place
Cause you just gave me the damn crown

[Chorus: Raye]
And I’m gonna wear it proud
Watch me as I wear it now
I’mma ride this money like a wave
This money like a wave, this money like a wave

[Bridge: Raye]
Now I made it this far, but this far ain’t nothing
If we’re talking ambition, I think you should know that I don’t wanna settle for nothing
I wanna know that I got myself
I wanna ride my money like a wave
My money like a wave, my money like a wave, yeah

[Verse 2: Raye]
I want the future, I want the best view
I’d like to buy all my day ones a house too
Collie, Ben, Jodie, I got you
I’ve got a list of everything I would do
Make that dumb guy regret what he did do
Then he’ll be calling up my phone like “I miss you”
Then I’ll be like “haha, you can go now
Cause you didn’t wanna know when I told you
I’m gonna make something of my life”
Believe that, yeah babe
I’ve got God, he is on my side
And I’m a child of ’97 so I plan to be on time
And I’m ahead of this game
Yes, I were meant for this life, oh

[Chorus: Raye]
And I’m gonna wear it proud
Watch me as I wear it now
I’mma ride this money like a wave
This money like a wave, this money like a wave

[Verse 3: Stormzy]
You know I only phone back
If I know that it’s the money calling
Tell ’em bitches “do not phone back
I am in the studio recording”
Mummy, listen when I’m talking
Mummy, listen, it’s important
I wasn’t gonna tell you, but I thought I’d let you know
That I just got us both a mortgage
Now it’s top floor with these fancy reservations
I don’t even like it, I’m just here for observations
Tryna tell the difference from my people and my pagans
Cuh’ the last time that I slipped, I had a sticky situation
I will never slip again, you can put that on my savings
They wait for me to fall, I keep on waiting
This feeling is amazing, how’s it feel to hate the kid
But deep inside, you know you rate him? Man, that shit must be frustrating

[Chorus: Raye]
And I’m gonna wear it proud
Watch me as I wear it now
I’mma ride this money like a wave
This money like a wave, this money like a wave

[Bridge: Raye]
Now I made it this far, but this far ain’t nothing
If we’re talking ambition, I think you should know that I don’t wanna settle for nothing
I wanna know that I got myself
I wanna ride my money like a wave
My money like a wave, my money like a wave, yeah

[Outro: Raye]
Now I made it this far, but this far ain’t nothing
If we’re talking ambition, I think you should know that I don’t wanna settle for nothing

Gorillaz – Duetz lyrics

[Verse 1: 2-D]
London outside
Sleeping in a Co-op window
Duetz
Duetz

[Chorus: 2-D ]
Washed away
(Let me get washed away)
Washed away
(Let me get washed away)

[Verse 2: 2-D]
No, no, no, it’s nothin’ new
To force a light above yourself in costume
‘Cause you might not ever make it if you look like that
Get by same roads in costume

[Chorus: 2-D]
(Let me get washed away)
(Let me get washed away)
(Let me get washed away)

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie – Way Too Fly Lyrics

[Intro: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
Yeah
Oh yeah
(Let’s go, let’s go)
Yeah
(Let’s go, let’s go)
Oh yeah

[Chorus: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
I’m way too fly, shine in the night time
I’m a vampire but I don’t bite, come outside when it’s daylight
But please don’t waste my time, I’m timeless I can’t lie
I bet I can hit it, give me one night (give me one night)
If I say the right lines

[Verse 1: Davido]
[?], said you the one though
Oh girl, I thought you said you the one
For your [?] girl, I’ll be a lover
[?], said you be the one
[?]
I was chilling by the bar
Sippin’ at the sea, you was having sex on the beach
Baby girl we gon’ shut down
[?], we go one time
This pussy got me on lockdown
I like it when she comes around, yeah

[Chorus: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
I’m way too fly, shine in the night time
I’m a vampire but I don’t bite, come outside when it’s daylight
But please don’t waste my time, I’m timeless I can’t lie
I bet I can hit it, give me one night (give me one night)
If I say the right lines

[Verse 2: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie]
I got the juice baby, yeah, put you in the mood baby, yeah
Sex with you was too crazy, yeah, wish there was two of you baby
Yeah, I need two of you, you should move how I move too, yeah
Black hoodie and some black boots in the 2018 Benz coupe, yeah
Left wrist lookin’ like ooh, and my pinky ring on froze, ooh yeah
Diamonds looking so cold, like an angel in the snow, yeah oh
All my niggas on go, act crazy on the road, mm-yeah
My Patek used to be gold, now it’s 54 a show, mm-yeah

[Chorus: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
I’m way too fly, shine in the night time
I’m a vampire but I don’t bite, come outside when its daylight
But please don’t waste my time, I’m timeless I can’t lie
I bet I can hit it, give me one night (give me one night)
If I say the right lines

[Outro: Davido]
Shout out to my New York baby
Shout out to my [?]
Shout out to my African baby
Love to my London lady

Skinny Lister – Wanted lyrics

[Verse]
There’s money on your head you’re a wanted face
Upside down I’m gonna turn this place
In the shadow of the city you’ve been laying low
Whoah – I won’t let go

[Chorus]
London don’t let me down
London don’t let me down this time
Take my luck and turn it round
London don’t let me down this time
Wo-oh
Wo-oh
Wo-oh
Wo-oh

[Verse]
Down the barrel of the night I’ve got you in my sights
A figure under flicker of an old street light
In the shadow of the city you’ve been laying low
Whoah – I won’t let go

[Chorus]
New York don’t let me down
New York don’t let me down this time
Take my luck and turn it round
New York don’t let me down this time
Wo-oh
Wo-oh
Wo-oh
Wo-oh

[Bridge]
Oh city lights
Show me love and show me life
Surrender yourself to me
In your streets I still believe

[Interlude]
I wanna feel alive, I wanna feel alive
I wanna feel alive, I wanna feel alive

[Chorus]
Take my luck and turn it round
Cairo don’t let me down this time
Wo-oh
(There’s money on your head)
Wo-oh
(you’re a wanted face)
Wo-oh
(Upside down I’m gonna turn this place)
Wo-oh
(In the shadow of the city you’ve been laying low)
Wo-oh
(Whoah – I wanna feel a-)
Wo-oh
(-live I wanna feel a-)
Wo-oh
(-live I wanna feel a-)
Wo-oh
(-live I wanna feel a-)
Wo-oh

A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie – Way Too Fly lyrics

(feat. Davido)

[Intro: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
Yeah
Oh yeah
(Let’s go, let’s go)
Yeah
(Let’s go, let’s go)
Oh yeah

[Chorus: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
I’m way too fly, shine in the night time
I’m a vampire but I don’t bite, come outside when it’s daylight
But please don’t waste my time, I’m timeless I can’t lie
I bet I can hit it, give me one night (give me one night)
If I say the right lines

[Verse]
Oh, girl, I tell you say you the one though
Oh, girl, I thought you said you the one
For your girl, I’ll be a lover
Said you be the one

[Verse]
I was chilling by the bar
Sippin’ at the sea, you was having sex on the beach
Baby girl we gon’ shut down, oh, my girl, we go one time
This pussy got me on lockdown, I like it when she comes around, yeah

[Chorus: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
I’m way too fly, shine in the night time
I’m a vampire but I don’t bite, come outside when it’s daylight
But please don’t waste my time, I’m timeless I can’t lie
I bet I can hit it, give me one night (give me one night)
If I say the right lines

[Verse 2: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie]
I got the juice baby, yeah, put you in the mood baby, yeah
Sex with you was too crazy, yeah, wish there was two of you baby
Yeah, I need two of you, you should move how I move too, yeah
Black hoodie and some black boots in the 2018 Benz coupe, yeah
Left wrist lookin’ like ooh, and my pinky ring on froze, ooh yeah
Diamonds looking so cold, like an angel in the snow, yeah oh
All my niggas on go, act crazy on the road, mm-yeah
My Patek used to be gold, now it’s 54 a show, mm-yeah

[Chorus: A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie & Davido]
I’m way too fly, shine in the night time
I’m a vampire but I don’t bite, come outside when it’s daylight
But please don’t waste my time, I’m timeless I can’t lie
I bet I can hit it, give me one night (give me one night)
If I say the right lines

[Outro: Davido]
Shout out to my New York baby
Shout out to my
Shout out to my African baby
Love to my London lady

Lil Skies – World Rage lyrics

[Intro]
Ayy, ayy
This that shit like
This that shit like where you just talk your shit like… haha
Go ‘head O
Ayy, I told them niggas like, look…
Danny, I see you

[Chorus]
Ayy, ayy, I need 20 for a verse, I need 40 for a show
I got bitches gettin’ naked, throwin’ money on the floor
Big Patek bust down, pussy hatin’ ’cause he broke
I ain’t never played the bitch, I’m in the game and that’s for sure
Claustrophobic, dropped the top, I had to switch lanes (skrrt)
My bitch is crazy, in her purse, she keeps a switchblade
I’m out of town, still wear the chain like I’m Johnny Dang
I make it rain in your city, bring the world rage

[Verse 1]
Lifestyle on 300, Sparta’s how we comin’ (we comin’)
Loverboy like I’m McLovin, I got bitches in London
You gon’ take a chance and get nothin’, niggas fake and be frontin’ (they fake)
Whole crowd lit, fist-pumpin’, on the stage, I’m jumpin’ (jump, jump)
I get cash in abundance, know I made it from my grind
I was waitin’ patiently, I knew this shit would take some time
She be sniffin’ too much coco, she can’t read between the lines
Fell in love with all the hype, now she don’t wanna go outside
I bust down the wrist, now my time is full of ice
I bust up my clique, now my niggas livin’ life
And you are full of shit if you think I would take advice
You were doin’ all the wrong to make sure I was never right

[Chorus]
Ayy, ayy, I need 20 for a verse, I need 40 for a show
I got bitches gettin’ naked, throwin’ money on the floor
Big Patek bust down, pussy hatin’ ’cause he broke
I ain’t never played the bitch, I’m in the game and that’s for sure
Claustrophobic, dropped the top, I had to switch lanes (skrrt)
My bitch is crazy, in her purse, she keeps a switchblade
I’m out of town, still wear the chain like I’m Johnny Dang
I make it rain in your city, bring the world rage

[Verse 2]
Ayy, and I can’t be tamed, put this shit on replay (replay)
Run her hand all through my braids, she know I’m the new wave (the wave)
Lately I’ve been on this chase, dark shades, Blu-Ray (Blu-Ray)
You will never take up my space, I don’t care what you say (you say)
I had to run it up
Don’t think that you’ve done enough, I blew up like Mrs. Puff
Now they all wanna fuck with us, and these girls fall in love with us
Like no, no, no, no, no
I gotta let you go, go, go, go, go, for real

Stacey J – Too Much lyrics

Intro
Stacey j
No 1 in African
Eazyprince on beat
Nahahaha
Listen

Verse 1
When am in trouble you gonna
Rescue me rescue me
If am in pain you gonna console me
Console me
When I need you uhh you gonna satisfy me satisfy me
You stand by me when people stand against me
Cos you my baby

Hook
E dey sweet me for body yoh
E dey sweet me for body oh oh
Baby carry me go away baby carry me go away
Dodorimado dodorimado oh oh narararara

Chorus
Baby you are too much oh
You are too much oh
Me and you go dey
Baby you are too much oh
You are too much onyekemo
Baby you are too much oh
You are too much oh
Me and you forever ah ah ah

Verse 2
You are giving me everything that I need oh
Ah ah ah
You showed me too much love baby oh
Your love dey killing me softly
Your love dey killing me eh eh
For your love I go go to American for your love
I go go to London oh my baby yeah
Baby yoh oh oh
You are my irreplaceable my one and only
No one but you, no one but you ah ah
Your love dey sweet for my belle
E dey totori my heart
Oh my baby oh
Dio dio dio dio dio dio oh
You are too much oh

Hook
E dey sweet me for body oh
E dey sweet me for body oh
Baby carry me go away baby carry me
Go away
Dodorimado dodorimado oh
Narararara

Chorus
Bsby you are too much oh
You are too much oh
Me and you go dey
Baby you are too much oh you are too much oh
Onyekemo oh
Babby you are too much oh
You are too much oh
Me and you forever ah ah ah

Is stacey j
Stacey j upon the sing
Ah ah ah ah
Eazy prince upon the beat oh
Ah ah ah ah

Jessie J – I Believe In Love lyrics

[Verse 1]
I find myself daydreaming of a better world
Memories can bleed in my open heart
London clouds are crying
But I’m dancing in the pouring rain
Grown up life is to learn not to fall apart

[Pre-Chorus]
And I’m closer to high vibrations
Climbing up the sweeter and deeper waves
And what I can do, to make it
To be happy
To be true to me, in every way

[Chorus]
I know I’ll be alright
I know that I’ll survive
I know I’ll rise above it
‘Cause I believe in love
And even when it’s hard
Livin’ with my scars
It never miles to nothing
‘Cause I believe in love

[Verse 2]
Nobody tells me how to grow, no
I just gotta know
Emotional, but I won’t define myself on the past
Balance is key
Understanding I can won’t be always in control
Sometimes the right road goes by taking the broken path

[Pre-Chorus]
Now I’m closer to high vibrations
Climbing up the sweeter and deeper waves
And what I can do, to make it
To be happy
To be true to me, in every way

[Chorus]
I know I’ll be alright
I know that I’ll survive
I know I’ll rise above it
‘Cause I believe in love
And even when it’s hard
Livin’ with my scars
It never miles to nothing
‘Cause I believe in love

[Bridge]
Yes
Keep it simple
Follow my heart
This love I’m into, yes
[?]
The more the time flies away
The closer it feels to wise with age
No energy is giving me life

[Outro]
‘Cause I believe in love
I believe, I believe in love
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yes
‘Cause I believe in love (I believe, I believe in love)
Oooh yeah, yeah
‘Cause I believe in love
Ohh, ‘cause I believe in love
I believe in love

OBLADAET – PANDA FREESTYLE (feat. STED.D) lyrics

[Интро: Obladaet x sted.d]
Панда, ха
Ра-ра-ра
Пррра
Окей
Окей
Панда
Е—еее
Панда
Панда, панда, панда, панда
Панда, панда, панда

[Куплет 1: Obladaet]
Делаю музыку, она не для стада
Много работаю, но не для стажа
Волнует прогресс, но даже на старте
Вижу успех после смс с банка
Total black, phantom
Я в монохроме, будто бы панда
Lacoste крокодил или вкинут на камо
Тусуем как психи, похожи на панков
Total black, phantom
В монохроме – как панда
Льем Bombay на пол
Вылез джин с даблкапа
Всё о себе, врубай за пасхалки
В вашем кино буду в роли бастарда
Видел их путь на банковских картах
Я должен не спать, чтобы выспаться в Ламбо
Делаю музыку, она не для стада
Много работаю, но не для стажа
Волнует прогресс, но даже на старте
Вижу успех после смс с банка
Total black, phantom
Я в монохроме, будто бы панда
Lacoste крокодил или вкинут на камо
Тусуем как психи, похожи на панков
Total black, phantom
В монохроме – как панда
Льем Bombay на пол
Вылез джин с даблкапа
Всё о себе, врубай за пасхалки
В вашем кино буду в роли бастарда
Видел их путь на банковских картах
Я должен не спать, чтобы выспаться в Ламбо

[Бридж: Obladaet]
Райдим, райдим, ха
Мы райдим, райдим
Панда
Пра-пра-пра
Ха
Панда
Е-е
Панда
Е-е-е-е
А, а
Панда, панда, панда, панда

[Куплет 2:Obladaet]
Видел меня на этих сайтах?
Я не просил, вы сделали сами
Скатился и меня везут эти сани
Жизнь как экзамен, живу как дизайнер
Броуди, ты знаешь?
В таксе AUX? что делать ты знаешь
Группис жалеют что с нами связались
И грязные мысли под чистым кристалом

[Куплет 3: Obladaet]
Total black, phantom
В монохроме, как панда
Льем Bombay на пол
Вылез джин с дабл капа
Забудь мне не нужны баттлы
Все само ползёт ко мне в лапы
Мы будто в тумане, тут вроде не London
Я должен не спать, чтобы выспаться в Ламбо
Они пишут “ты топ, Обла”
Давай как раньше, стоп, Обла”
Меняюсь, но я все тот Обла
И отдай мне кэш за альбом года
За альбом года?
Я правда душу за альбом продал
Оу, черт! я записал альбом с богом
И альбом стильный, будто альбом с модой
Collezioni
На красных глазах мы летим на зелёный
Вся туса на траур, ведь убились в субботу
Что делал вчера всегда помню сегодня (Помню сегодня!)
Основа на поле
Ты хотел дроп? трек снова на воле
Ты лезешь с советом – меня не заботит
Я занят делом, но я не на работе

[Бридж: Obladaet x sted.d]
А
Ха
Панда, панда, панда
Е-е-е
Пау, пау, пау
Панда
Панда, панда, панда

[Куплет 4: Sted. d]
Totall black – phanthom
В монохроме, как панда
Кубок ядреного пойла в банду
Вывод нала на новый bottle
Я сыт по горло унылым адом
Их слэнг подобен кретинам с арго
Разлом в культуре за пару сек
Едем на это кино – в икарусе
Oh my gosh, правда
Ты выиграл суку в корейский рандом
Зачем сундук, у меня есть карта?
Мы в booty bay с моей командой
Е-е
Свеж, как дъявол
Внутри меня кто-то, он рвётся когтями
Среди безнадежных кварталов рецепты от кашля, как рай для бродяги
Айо
Я снова болен – в моем бомбее густое горе
Мы видели много людей, но не один их них не подарит покоя
Я в этих пустышек теряюсь easy
Смешался с толпой, их никчемной жизнью
Я обеспокоен
Но кап полон: в нем чай с мятой, вискарь с колой
Totall black – phanthom
В монохроме, как панда
Кубок ядреного пойла got em
Вывод нала – кислотный слалом
Мы катим в кромешной тьме
Я демон от музыки – всё в огне
Ты лезешь с советом – дам ответ
Душа – мертва, я не с ней

[Аутро: Obladaet]
А-а-а
Панда, Панда